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Showing posts with the label acute and chronic pain types

Learning the Various States of Mind and How Mindfulness Can Help Us Feel Less Intense Pain

Mindfulness Verses Mindlessness and the Various States of Mind that Follow  We all have various moods. This is absolutely normal. We are humans beings who experience a range of emotions ranging from mild to intense.  Moods can also be known as various states of mind. One always wants to examine the distinct difference between these constantly shifting states. This helps to build awareness of how we are feeling when in these extremely different states of mind. This is an Image of Being Mindful  The above image shows a peaceful scene of the beach, sand, rocks, glaciers and ocean. These all remind of us serenity, peace and tranquility. It is not being shown to look at it in that way however. It is shown to notice the different things that we see when we look at that photograph and the words within it. The word Mindful is also an acronym.  Moment to Moment Attention In the Here and Now Non Judgemental Attitude Detatch from Unhelpful Thoughts Forgive and be Greatful Unconditional Acceptance

Types of Pain and how Physical and Emotional Pain Correlate As the disaster duo

What are the Types of Pain One Can Have and How Do We Accurately Assess the Level  of Pain? Pain is a concept that is different to all people. Many medical facilities use a rating scale of 1-10 to rate your pain. Does this seem like an accurate assessment to you? When asked this question, how do you answer? Most of us think for a minute and pause. Next, we look at the attending physician with a little bit of confusion as to how they will rate your rating. If you say a 5 does that mean you feel "manageable pain"? If you say 10, are you feeling like you are being dramatic when you are truly feeling completely drained  physically, emotionally and all of your thoughts and focuses are on this pain.  Can you truly rate it a 10?  The Famous 1-10 Scale of Pain Assessment  Number scales are extremely difficult to use to assess pain. Many chronic pain patients feel some kind of confusion when it comes to the rating scale. We are so afraid of being” rated back” or not taken seriously be